Pea Breeding 2015: The Quest for the Red Podded (snap) Pea

A rough example of how the genetics work in peas to create a red-podded pea.
A rough example of how the genetics work in peas to create a red-podded pea.

Gardening this year has been sparse. Mainly Peas, Watermelon, a few purple-stalked indian corn plants, 2 sunflowers, and some pepper seedlings. However progress is being made on the pea breeding front. Thanks to Joseph Lofthouse i was able to receive a small sample of his F4 cross between an unremarkable and unnamed, but yellow snow pea and Sugar Magnolia a good purple snap pea. This has expedited my own quest for a good red podded pea.

Joseph’s F4 Red Podded (snap) Pea
Contrast between a red podded snap pea and a yellow snow pea
partially red-podded peas
yellow snap pea with red spots
Partially red partially yellow snow peas

For those who are interested roughly in how the genetics works i will give my best simple explanations here. The modified google logo above is a horrible, but extremely basic diagram of how the red podded peas are bred. It requires the combination of yellow podded peas (which are recessive) and purple podded peas which are dominant (however there are three genes involved, which means that if only some are present they are only partially dominant). Purple pods have a green pod underneath, but if you can get a yellow pod as the base color, then you get red pods. The real trick after crossing such peas is to get the recombinant offspring that you desire. You need to get two recessive genes for yellow pods in addition to at least 1 of each of the purple genes. But if you only get some of the purple genes and not two copies for each then you get splotchy pods. You get partially yellow partially red pods. Sometimes this can be fixed by just growing several generations and letting them segregate themselves. This is possible because peas are naturally self pollinating. The problem is sometimes one of the purple genes will segregate out and you will forever have only a partially red pea pod which will never stabilize unless you use it to do another cross.

Here is the predicted results of the F1 generation between a purple podded parent and a yellow podded parent, with the assumption that the purple podded parent is heterozygous for all 3 purple genes. This chart was done after reading about rebsie’s F1 generation having mostly green pods.

:+

Here is an “average” prediction of the F2 generation. This is excluding one of the purple genes, because by this point you should be selecting from only purple pods. green pods will never give you purple pods, which in turn will never give you red pods.

Even Joseph’s F4 generation is still segregating between Snap pods and Snow pods, and red and yellow pea pods. So, I have some of my first red podded peas thanks to Joseph Lofthouse in Utah. And i’ve been doing as many pea crosses as i can myself. Not only for red-podded peas, but umbellatum types, pink pea flowers, large pods, snap pods, dwarf plants, etc. Should be fun. 🙂

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