Preview: Zamenhof meets 3D Printing?

Screenshot from 2016-05-18 07-48-01

Antaŭprezenton / Antaŭrigardon : Zamenhof renkontas 3D presanta?

Cŭ Zamenhof kunvenos KNK (Komputilo Nombra Kontrolo) maŝinojn?

Will Zamenhof meet CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machines?

Cŭ Esperanto renkontos 3D Presanta?

Will Esperanto meet 3D Printing?

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Project Updates November 2015

80/20 1020 Extruded aluminum t-slot y-axis 3d printer bracket
80/20 1020 Extruded aluminum t-slot y-axis 3d printer bracket

The first update is that i’m still steadily designing new parts in solidworks for my custom 3D printer. This photo is one of two y-brackets that will hold the 1020 size t-slot extruded aluminum (from 80/20) y-axis beam. It looked good in Solidworks, now it just needs to be fabricated (3d printed) into a real-world working part (as with many other parts).

Y-bracket for custom 3D printer
Y-axis bracket for custom 3D printer

It’s really fun designing parts and then seeing them become real functional parts. Recently I’ve even been looking into a local program for CNC machinist training as a job. Apparently there is a large shortage of qualified CNC machinists in my area along with a booming and returning engineering and manufacturing hub here in the area.

While i was designing new parts and fitting them together i found a few minor problems with a few of my old designs being off and not lining up properly with the 1020 extruded aluminum. So i spent some time fixing that and cleaning them up a bit. Good to find those errors on the computer first than after i make the parts.

I received the prototype PCB’s for the XYZZY Motor Controller 1.0, The downside is I’ve found numerous errors that i missed, so I’ve been trying to fix those. But then to compound those problems the main circuit itself has a problem where the HIP4081A h-bridge chip circuit is only driving a motor (in this case a test load LED) in one direction. At first it was shorting out the other direction, but now i think it just loads the current down and does not activate one side of the hbridge. It’s actually driving me crazy trying to fix it and find the cause of the problem, but it’s still quite a mystery. Perhaps electronics is just not my thing. Perhaps i really should give up on that project after never being able to have good success. But i don’t know.

In plant breeding news: i was able to harvest three corn cobs this year. Two were decent sized purple husked corn cobs, the other was a good multi-colored flint. The third one had lots of kernel color diversity, it even had several speckled kernels, and chin-marked ones, and even some that had both speckles and stripes! I recently found purple sweet potatoes at Whole Foods and i will be trying to sprout one and grow my own slips for next year.

I was also able to grow a few good squash this year, some good progress on the pea breeding, and an excellent year with Joseph’s Watermelon Landrace. Sorry, i didn’t get good photo’s of the watermelons, but i had some excellent red sweet watermelons and some good yellows as well. Especially for Northern Colorado, the watermelons are the plant breeding project i’m most excited about and ironically having the best success. Can’t wait for next year! And all this despite it being an incredible difficult and strange gardening year!

3d printer custom motor mount prototype

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3d printed 80/20 tslot stepper motor mount

Last week I printed out a prototype stepper motor mount for my 3d printer project. I modeled it in Solidworks (2007). This fits a 10 series 1″ 80/20 brand tslot extruded aluminum. This one had a few minor problems, but I think it will work anyway. I’ve updated my CAD model for when I print the other one. This will allow for two lead screws for the z-axis.

Steadily my 3D printer is coming together. I’m surprised at how many parts will be custom 3D printed parts. My goal is have the original reprap goal of striving for 90% able to replicate it’s own parts. If i’m able to get this design to work i should be able to 3D print the t-slot frame which is a huge chunk of it’s material and size! I’m not aware of many repraps being able to reproduce their own frame! …only time will tell…

DIY 3D Printer progress piece by piece

One of my newly resurrected projects is my ambition to deign and build my own functional 3d printer. Eventually i’d love to just purchase a nice one, but i’d also like to build my own (besides i already have most of the parts and mine would be bigger too). The pre-made model i would buy is the Lulzbot mini. Mainly because they are fantastically built machines, but also because they are produced by a company here in my own town! Plus they have a philosophical commitment to open source which i love.

Anyway, building off of my original post in 2011, I’m designing from scratch a 2ft x 2ft 3d printer. I’ve been steadily making good progress piece by piece, step by step. My main design criteria are: as close to a 2ft x 2ft build area as possible (maximizing build area vs machine footprint), using 1″ 10 series 80/20 t-slot extruded aluminum, minimizing unneeded parts by using t-slot linear bearings (real aluminum ones and 3d printed working replicas), and trying to just have a simple design by default. I’ve had fun these last few weeks by printing out working 80/20 linear bearing CAD models into working plastic prototypes. My next step is to print out some motor mounts. I’ve designed two motor mounts so far. The first one is a snug mount that shapely fits around a motor and has built in t-slot mounts intended for the z axis lead screws. The second is a simple right angle slotted mount for y-axis that has a belt drive. I have them modeled in Solidworks 2007. I just need to print them out to see if they will work.

motor mount 1

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3d printed linear bearing (80/20 t-slot)
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Initial frame of diy 3d printer with 3d printed linear bearings in view (80/20 t-slot)

Rediscovering 3d CAD because of 3D Printers

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This past week (maybe 2) I’ve been utterly obsessed with 3D printer stuff. It has gotten me excited about 3D drafting and CAD all over again. Simply because you can create a 3 dimensional object on a computer in a matter of minutes or hours and render it to look completely realistic, but now because of 3d printers you can actually make those objects (if you so wished)! Awesome!

Yesterday and Today I’ve been playing around with Solidworks again. My ancient 2007 version of solidworks. lol. But it works non-the-less. Although i’d love to try out Autodesk 123d Design (which is free). But, why oh why are there still no good CAD programs that run nativity on Linux. Especially if you have a Mac version. If it runs on Mac it can easily be ported to Linux. Why do you think the Arduinos and the rep-raps, and open-source, and so many other great things have taken over the world by storm? Yes it’s because they are great products, but also because they are cross-platform! Okay, End-Of-Rant.

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But Seriously, i actually really like designing something in CAD if it’s something i’m excited about. Today i ventured into the realm of something relatively simple, test tube racks. But sadly there are not currently very good designs for test tube racks available. Which actually surprised me. The three best places I look for pre-made CAD files are at 3dContentCentral, which is the oldest site of this kind that i ever encountered. It is mostly for people who use solidworks, but the great thing about the site is that it has a tool that can convert to and from many different CAD formats, including solidworks formats, IGES, STEP, STL, etc. The second is GrabCad. GrabCad is a new community also aimed at engineers sharing CAD models freely. It dosen’t have the nice file converter that 3dContentCentral has, but it has a vibrant community that provides feedback, help, and will check out your designs. Someone on GrabCad actually helped render the nice  looking wood rendering of my 1950s style test tube rack. How nice! Thank You! And the third is the famous MakerBot Thingiverse. Thingiverse is less focused on CAD formats and instead is focused on creative designs optimized for 3D printing. At minimum an STL file will be available for anyone to download and print on any 3d printer they have access to. I currently dont own my own 3d printer, but am currently using the Lulzbot mini that currently resides at my local library. How’s that for public access?!!

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So these are the three test tube racks i modeled today in Solidworks. Not super amazing i suppose, but i’m proud of them. My favorite is the nice wooden 1950s style test tube rack. I partly chose to start with that one because i have one that looks just like that looks like it was made by a monkey in china. It seriously is not as nice as my virtual one and not anywhere near as fancy looking either. But also because it is the standard test tube rack featured in the banned 1960s DIY chemistry book: The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments. It was just begging to be brought into the modern world.

I then ventured into modeling a simple test tube rack because there were none available that i liked. I may make a smaller version of this one for 3d printers that have small print beds. Perhaps one with only 4 test tubes.

The last one i modeled after a nice round plastic test tube rack I’ve seen on the internet. I don’t have one, but I’ve been meaning to buy one. But i wanted to model one in Solidworks and create one that fit on a Lulzbot mini 6″ X 6″ print area that other people could print out too. So i made one of appropriate size and then made it able to split in two to be printed easily. I really like how the design came out. I hope to be able to test it out by printing my own sometime.

1950s Style Test Tube Rack:

Thingiverse3dContentCentralGrabCAD

Economy Style Test Tube Rack:

Thingiverse3dContentCentralGrabCAD

Round Mini Test Tube Rack:

Thingiverse3dContentCentralGrabCAD

2nd batch of 3d printed parts!

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Today I tried printed out more 3d printed plastic from the library Lulzbot mini. I printed 3 more 90 degree corner brackets for my old 1″ extruded aluminum 80/20 brand t-slot that I originally bought to make a rep-rap 3d printer and/or CNC mill. I never finished it I might add. Perhaps I will pick that project up again. It would certainly fit my trend this year of finishing old abandoned projects (like my xyzzy motor controller).

I also printed two spacers from my solidworks files for my homemade taffy machine. (They came out great). And I tried my hand at making a copy of my own house key. They key didn’t print the best, and in addition did not fit in the doorknob for some unknown reason. 😦

The biggest accomplishment today was printing plastic copies of the 80/20 t-slot linear bearings. I still prefer the aluminum ones, but my low cost ABS plastic ones are much affordable and should work fine anyway! The ABS is actually some what slippery and does work by itself despite it not being great.

The plastic with Teflon (actually HDPE) tabs screwed on works just as nicely as the aluminum ones do. I think I will print more (and bigger ones) in the near future. These should help greatly in turning this into a giant 3d printer!

First 3d printed parts!

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I printed my first 3d printed parts on Saturday. I used a publicly available Lulzbot mini. The gears turned out great. The software was extremely easy to use. Just click and print, quite literally. The open source Cura software was just beautiful. The lulzbot mini has consistently been critics top 3d printer for being the easiest to set up and use. And I can see why.