Growing Watermelon Landrace in Colorado 2017 Success!!!

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Most of the watermelons are done for the year and eaten already. Many of them were good tasty Canary Yellows. One Salmon-yellow and one Pink were so/so. I’m trying to not save seeds from now on from any that taste bland like the salmon-yellows. Or others that grow poorly. I think i will also start selecting against those that have bacterial rot at the flower end and those that split open. But i’m happy in the direction these are headed. I have a side breeding project where i am letting some Colorado red-seeded citron being pollinated by the landrace watermelon. I’m hoping that in the future that leads to a more cold-tolerant yellow fleshed red-seeded watermelon strain. Some seeds from those are all crazy colors this year with some partially red-black and others with unique gray spots. Just a side project for now.

Generally the small bowl-sized watermelons are from my garden. I had the opportunity to have a small local organic farmer grow some of the landrace watermelons for me in fertilized soil and on black plastic. Those ones grew a little bigger for him. I was able to purchase and collect a few of those back. The long one looked like a yellow-fleshed Lofthouse Charleston Gray strain to me… but i don’t know for sure. I cut it open a little early. Apparently the long ones take longer to ripen so the dry three-tendril method didn’t exactly work on those, but it did for my small round ones!

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All in All i’m happy to finally be able to grow decent sized tasty watermelons here in the heart of Northern Colorado. Where few are able to succeed at growing watermelon at all! Success!!!!

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Calculating Growing Season – Revisited 2015

Several years back i investigated using locally available weather station data to average weather data and to speculate (hopefully accurate) weather patterns and more important to me an estimate of the length of time i have to grow things in my area and climate. In a sense it worked, but it was limited by my relative lack of long-term data over a number of years. This past spring i decided to try it again and use more years if possible. These graphs are what i came up with:

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Growing Season graph of Northern Colorado

The first graph is basically a line graph. In reality i used about 5 years years worth of weather data, but to make it easier to see i simplified it to 3 years and an average line. The average line really helped because as you can see each year had some significant differences in spikes of heat and dips of cool, but the overall pattern is the same. It’s the pattern i’m interested it. Because in theory it should be relatively stable and should provide an accurate estimate of my growing season and when the best times are to plant and best times to harvest before fall frosts.

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Growing Season Graph of Loveland, Colorado

Graph number 2 is actually better and easier to read. Instead of using a line graph it uses a bar graph type to display the data which is easier to read and use. Both graphs i used a (cooling) growing degree days base of 50F.  50 degrees Fahrenheit is the stated lowest temp that warm season crops like squash will grow at. To help increase accuracy of my growing season i drew an arbitrary line at the 20 degree mark above the base temp of 50F, so that would be 70F?, i think. Anyway, this gave me a rough estimate that i could plant warm season crops as early as April 22nd-ish and that my season would end about October 28th. It turned out my end-of-season prediction was fairly dead on this year as i think we got a frost on October 27th. The beauty of not simply setting a base of 60F or 70F and cutting anything below that off is that it gives me a rough estimate of my growing season for cool season and frost-tolerant crops as well. According to this i possibly could have planted peas, radishes, etc around March 11th in spring and in fall possibly as late producing as November 18th. Interesting. I have never planted anything as early as March 11th, even cool season crops. …Maybe i should…

…so yeah.. anyway it seems fairly accurate for my uses. I have yet to graph good rain data yet. But this graph is a rough estimate for the growing season in Loveland Colorado, Fort Collins Colorado, Greeley, and any other nearby places. But if at all possible please use the weather data from your nearest weather station.

www.degreedays.net/ (download “cooling degree days” data)

Wunderground.com (direct access to your local mini weather stations)

Originally inspired by Joseph Lofthouse. The original thread that started it all: http://alanbishop.proboards.com/thread/5337/corn-breeding-heat-units-charts?page=1