Growing Watermelon Landrace in Colorado 2017 Success!!!


Most of the watermelons are done for the year and eaten already. Many of them were good tasty Canary Yellows. One Salmon-yellow and one Pink were so/so. I’m trying to not save seeds from now on from any that taste bland like the salmon-yellows. Or others that grow poorly. I think i will also start selecting against those that have bacterial rot at the flower end and those that split open. But i’m happy in the direction these are headed. I have a side breeding project where i am letting some Colorado red-seeded citron being pollinated by the landrace watermelon. I’m hoping that in the future that leads to a more cold-tolerant yellow fleshed red-seeded watermelon strain. Some seeds from those are all crazy colors this year with some partially red-black and others with unique gray spots. Just a side project for now.

Generally the small bowl-sized watermelons are from my garden. I had the opportunity to have a small local organic farmer grow some of the landrace watermelons for me in fertilized soil and on black plastic. Those ones grew a little bigger for him. I was able to purchase and collect a few of those back. The long one looked like a yellow-fleshed Lofthouse Charleston Gray strain to me… but i don’t know for sure. I cut it open a little early. Apparently the long ones take longer to ripen so the dry three-tendril method didn’t exactly work on those, but it did for my small round ones!











All in All i’m happy to finally be able to grow decent sized tasty watermelons here in the heart of Northern Colorado. Where few are able to succeed at growing watermelon at all! Success!!!!


‘Wild Pueblo’ Squash Variety (2015)

Wild Pueblo Squash, Loveland Colorado 2012

I feel somewhat bad that i haven’t done much with plant breeding posts or other projects like my homemade Taffy Machine, or chemistry. I had some of those projects listed on my website. Unfortunately my website has been neglected my me and is currently down and redirects here. Perhaps by next year i can work on it again. Until then, i will try my best to diversify my blog and post some of it here.


This year i was able to grow some squash. In particular i was able to grow a few plants of my ‘Wild Pueblo’ Squash. Cucurbita maxima ‘Wild Pueblo’. Wild Pueblo is the name i have given it after both of our native pueblo ancestry. The woman who was kind enough to give me seeds was originally calling it Wild Hopi. But since i do not know if this is specifically a squash grown by the Hopi i decided to rename it. In any case it seems to be an Ancestral Puebloan variety of squash that is very old.

Photo by Bobbi HolyOak, 2011, Moab Utah

In the past i never really cared that much about squash. Probably because i always had the attitude that all squash are the same. But, since I’ve been trying to find my own crops that are personal and thrive in my climate (even resorting to breeding some from scratch), I’ve decided that it would be incomplete without my own squash. In fact i think my squash are becoming my favorite thing to grow. I have a feeling that squash are going to be my favorite crop. There is just something special about seeing a squash plant growing from seed. Almost sacred and special. It’s hard to explain. Corn has a similar effect on me, but even more so with squash.


Wild Pueblo was originally recovered growing in the wild of southeast Utah somewhere around the Monticello area. Close to the famous Newspaper Rock historic site. It was said to be found off the beaten track growing behind an old somewhat hidden pueblo ruin. Next to the ruin was a small stream. Growing next to the stream was a large squash plant with several large ripe squash fruit. I estimate that it is possible that it could have been growing undisturbed in that area for over 150 years! If so, this thing could have some awesome genetics. I’m doing my best to grow out the seed and preserve this variety.

Wild Pueblo Squash, 2012
Wild Pueblo Squash, 2012, Loveland Colorado
Wild Pueblo Squash on the left. Hopi White Squash on the right.

I suspect Wild Pueblo is an older variety of squash which may be related to a landrace which may have been used to breed the variety called “lakota squash”. according to reports…

“The Lakota squash, a mid-1990’s open-pollinated introduction developed at the University of Nebraska by Dr. D. P. Coyne. Dr. Coyne experimented with crosses and selections to assure more uniform pigmentation of this beautiful squash before making it available to the trade.

Lakota squash was developed from seeds obtained by the University from Nebraska’s Fort Robinson, once a prairie Cavalry post, later an agricultural site, now a National Park. The variety it was derived from is no longer in cultivation. It had been grown by Native American peoples along the Missouri Valley for centuries before the arrival of Europeans to the continent. This indigenous squash was also cultivated by the troops stationed at Nebraska’s Forts Atkinson and Robinson, and by early Nebraska settlers.”

Edit: after talking to someone at the University of Nebraska who worked with Dr. Coyne with the original germplasm of the non-hubbard parent landrace of squash i am told the fruits were actually oblong. Still might be worth trying to grow out that accession of seed before it’s no longer viable and available… i will see if i can get some seed…

I have only grown this variety twice, but even so it has some incredible diversity which i find absolutely fascinating. In time i think i can do some great things with it, perhaps even selecting it to grow even better.

Photo by Bobbi HolyOak, 2011, Moab Utah

This year was a very odd year to grow things. Perhaps the El Nino weather was to blame. I don’t know. All i can say is that my squash took all season to grow anything at all. I only got one plant that grew big and produced a large squash, the rest were small, but contained seeds. Next year i will try to plant more and do better.

Like i said before, it has a LOT of diverse genetics!


All i can say for now is that it is good to be home.

Pea Breeding 2015: The Quest for the Red Podded (snap) Pea

A rough example of how the genetics work in peas to create a red-podded pea.
A rough example of how the genetics work in peas to create a red-podded pea.

Gardening this year has been sparse. Mainly Peas, Watermelon, a few purple-stalked indian corn plants, 2 sunflowers, and some pepper seedlings. However progress is being made on the pea breeding front. Thanks to Joseph Lofthouse i was able to receive a small sample of his F4 cross between an unremarkable and unnamed, but yellow snow pea and Sugar Magnolia a good purple snap pea. This has expedited my own quest for a good red podded pea.


Contrast between a red podded snap pea and a yellow snow pea




For those who are interested roughly in how the genetics works i will give my best simple explanations here. The modified google logo above is a horrible, but extremely basic diagram of how the red podded peas are bred. It requires the combination of yellow podded peas (which are recessive) and purple podded peas which are dominant (however there are three genes involved, which means that if only some are present they are only partially dominant). Purple pods have a green pod underneath, but if you can get a yellow pod as the base color, then you get red pods. The real trick after crossing such peas is to get the recombinant offspring that you desire. You need to get two recessive genes for yellow pods in addition to at least 1 of each of the purple genes. But if you only get some of the purple genes and not two copies for each then you get splotchy pods. You get partially yellow partially red pods. Sometimes this can be fixed by just growing several generations and letting them segregate themselves. This is possible because peas are naturally self pollinating. The problem is sometimes one of the purple genes will segregate out and you will forever have only a partially red pea pod which will never stabilize unless you use it to do another cross.

Here is the predicted results of the F1 generation between a purple podded parent and a yellow podded parent, with the assumption that the purple podded parent is heterozygous for all 3 purple genes. This chart was done after reading about rebsie’s F1 generation having mostly green pods.


Here is an “average” prediction of the F2 generation. This is excluding one of the purple genes, because by this point you should be selecting from only purple pods. green pods will never give you purple pods, which in turn will never give you red pods.


Even Joseph’s F4 generation is still segregating between Snap pods and Snow pods, and red and yellow pea pods. So, I have some of my first red podded peas thanks to Joseph Lofthouse in Utah. And i’ve been doing as many pea crosses as i can myself. Not only for red-podded peas, but umbellatum types, pink pea flowers, large pods, snap pods, dwarf plants, etc. Should be fun. 🙂